From Features to Benefits to Emotions

From Features to Benefits to Emotions

Eureka! You’ve just stumbled upon one of the most obvious advantages your homes offer that’s not found in other builders’ homes. Once they know, customers will beat a path to your door! But before you commit to that advertising campaign, let’s see what we can learn from Apple.

In the age of Sony Walkman personal CD players, Apple introduced the iPod, which could hold a lot more music than a single CD-Rom. Apple capitalized on that benefit with their slogan, “1000 songs in your pocket.” The advantage was obvious…and enormous!

Yet, according to marketing/branding guru Alessandra Ghini who was working for Apple on the iPod at that time, “the tagline failed to take the iPod mainstream.” Apparently, storage space wasn’t the point. As reported in Fast Company, Ghini’s team asked owners, “Why do you enjoy the iPod?” Consumer feedback centered around the emotions music can evoke from each listener. Ghini’s team refocused iPod advertising on the now ubiquitous human silhouettes enjoying their music, and another chapter in the annals of Apple’s success was written.

Holding 1000 songs was a factual benefit of the iPod. Yet, in that context, the appeal was limited. Apple’s home run came with tapping into buyers’ emotions surrounding using the product, specifically music’s ability to affect/enhance our mood.

Now, let’s return to that new amenity offered in your homes. We’ll use the Travel Center in the owner’s suite closet as an example. Properly staged, a Travel Center is obvious and easily understood by your model home visitors. But will it actually sell more homes? That depends on how those model home visitors feel.

Stories are a powerful way to tap into buyer’s emotions. “You know, I nearly broke my ankle when I tripped over the suitcase in my closet.” Or, “I love the travel center because everything’s ready, right there, for an unexpected trip.” Asking, “How do you see yourself using the Travel Center?” or to the frequent traveler “How would it make you feel to have everything for your next trip right here at your fingertips?” can help prospects envision living in the home and using the travel center.

Remember, buyers buy on emotion!

Most any plans with a walk-in closet can incorporate a Travel Center into the design, but here is a selection of plans with Travel Centers already designed:

Say ‘NO’ to Boring Closet Design

Say ‘NO’ to Boring Closet Design

Oftentimes the closet is the forgotten space–throw up some rods and maybe a few shelves and call it good. But, it doesn’t have to be boring. Why not make it your own and give it some flair AND functionality?

Storage can be Beautiful!

Who said closets have to be off-white with a few rods, shelves, and a cheap light fixture? Especially if you have a nice-sized walk-in closet, don’t be afraid to have fun with color! Accessory pieces such as baskets also express “you,” and padded or wooden hangers are a reminder that your closet is more than a mere storage area.  A lack of electrical outlets becomes a source of irritation. And when the lighting solution is a naked bulb showcasing a $5 fixture, you can do better.

Never Run Out of Storage

Well-designed closet storage systems can actually hold twice as much as the standard rod and shelf approach. In addition, storage systems help you organize your stuff…and your life! Some closet systems offer interchangeable accessories allowing you to tailor the storage as your needs change.

Have a Seat

Few things are as handy as having a place to sit down when dressing. If your closet has a window, it presents a perfect location for a seat. The natural light is wonderful, and you wouldn’t have hanging or shelving in front of the window. Build the seat with a hinged top for added storage or perhaps a place to discretely store a safe for your valuables.

Owner’s Suite Closet Placement

It is somewhat surprising how strong people’s opinions are on access to the owner’s bedroom closet. Fans of transitioning to the closet from the bathroom point out they can get ready for the day without waking their mate from the inevitable treks-across-the-bedroom between the bathroom and closet. Individuals who prefer a separate entrance to the closet from the bedroom often cite concerns over excess humidity from the bathroom damaging clothes. Solution: Keep them separate so you don’t have to trek through one to get to the other.

Get more design tips from our Home Design Trends library.

(Photo courtesy Organized Living)

“The Great Closet Debate”

“The Great Closet Debate”

A debate rages over Owner’s suite closet position and access. Some buyers prefer the convenience of entering the closet(s) directly from the owner’s bath area, as shown in plan #50023. This approach minimizes noise and disruption in the bedroom when, say, one spouse is getting ready while the other is trying to sleep. It also allows the combined bathroom + closet areas to double as dressing areas. Yet, many buyers fear excess bathroom humidity will damage clothing in the closet(s). Seemingly the same layout in reverse, in Scholz Design’s plan 55177 the homeowners walk through the closet area en route to the adjoining bathroom.

50023
50023
55177
55177

Homes That Flow design 29802 provides abundant separation between the closets and the bathroom. Concern over excess humidity is eliminated, but there is the aforementioned disruption in using a part of the bedroom as a traffic way. Carmichael and Dame plan 9210 presents a short hallway that keeps the doors to both the bathroom and the closet out of the bedroom itself, yet they are just a couple steps apart.

29802
29802
9210
9210

From These examples, which do you prefer?

Home Design Links

55177
50023
29802
9210

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